January 23-25, 2018

San Francisco, CA

 

Morning Workshop (SOLD OUT)
Tuesday, January 23rd 2018

09.00 - 12.00

Humanized Mice for Immuno-Oncology


Workshop Leader: James Keck, Senior Director for the Clinical Lab & In Vivo Pharmacology Services, The Jackson Laboratory Workshop Leader: Janine Low-Marchelli, Senior Technical Information Scientist, The Jackson Laboratory

Understanding the interactions between human immune cells and tumors is paramount when devising treatment strategies that prevent tumor evasion of immune cells and improve cytotoxic responses.

In this workshop you will find:

  • Patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models recapitulate disease progression and respond to standard of care (SoC) and experimental therapies
  • Specialized, immunodeficient mouse models are efficiently reconstituted with functional human immune cells
  • Tumor-bearing, humanized NSG and NSG-SGM3 (Onco-Hu) mice are a new and valuable tool for immuno-oncology research

James Keck, Senior Director for the Clinical Lab & In Vivo Pharmacology Services, The Jackson Laboratory

James Keck’s expertise is in the  therapeutic areas of oncology, virology, and inflammatory and metabolic diseases. During his career he has lead teams working in animal pharmacology, assay development, drug discovery, target identification, protein expression, and translational research.

Janine Low-Marchelli, Senior Technical Information Scientist, The Jackson Laboratory

Janine Low-Marchelli studied breast cancer metastasis as a graduate student and leukemic stem cell quiescence as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego. Janine joined the Technical Information Scientist team at The Jackson Laboratory in 2014 with primary interests in supporting mouse researchers worldwide with technical education.

Afternoon Workshop
Tuesday, January 23rd 2018

13.00 - 16.00

Models and methods for studying tumor heterogeneity and metastases


Workshop Leader: Joshua Breunig, Assistant Professor, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Workshop Leader: Simon Knott, Assistant Professor & Associate Director, Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics, Cedars Sinai Medical Center



The deadliest cancers are often characterized by significant intratumoral heterogeneity, which is often increased in metastases or recurrent tumors. Comprehending the mechanisms of heterogeneity and the patterns of divergence in tumor subtypes will be a significant factor in designing the next generation of anti-tumor therapeutics, including immunotherapies and small molecule inhibitors


In this workshop you will learn:

  • Emerging findings in primary patient samples and models regarding the striking heterogeneity in high-grade tumors
  • New methodologies for characterizing the emergence of intratumoral heterogeneity through the creation of lineage trees
  • State-of-the-art techniques for comparing metastatic populations to the original tumor

Joshua Breunig, Assistant Professor, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Joshua Breunig, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center with a joint appointment in the Department of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Dr. Breunig received his Ph.D. from Yale University. Currently, he investigates the transcriptional regulation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the brain, specifically exploring the pathways governing the transformation of NPCs into brain tumor progenitors. Using a next generation brain tumor models, his lab introduces patient-specific mutations to create “personalized” tumors in immunocompetent animal models. Dr. Breunig is supported by funding from the American Cancer Society, and NIH/NCI.

Simon Knott, Assistant Professor & Associate Director, Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics, Cedars Sinai Medical Center

Simon Knott, PhD, is an assistant professor and associate director of the Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics at Cedars Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Knott combines computational biology and functional genomics to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer progression.  Work in his laboratory is focused on three main areas: heterogeneity in cancer cell populations and how it impacts disease outcome, hetero-cellular interactions that allow cancer cells to manipulate the tumor microenvironment to evade therapy, and the development of novel computational and molecular tools to study disease progression